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World's
Largest Musical Instrument Ensemble
or
Largest Wobble Board Ensemble

Salt Lake Tribune newspaper article (November 12, 2007)
Deseret Morning News newspaper article (November 17, 2007)
FOX13 Channel 13 Television news report (November 9, 2007)
ABC4 Channel 4 Television news report (November 10, 2007)

On Friday, November 9, 2007, 487 students, teachers and adults at Eisenhower Junior High School in Taylorsville, Utah, broke the Guinness World Record for the World's Largest Musical Instrument Ensemble (for Unconventional Instruments). Guinness also calls this record the World's Largest Wobble Board Ensemble. Eisenhower's 487 participants played the Wobble Boards (by propping them between the palms of their hands and bouncing them back and forth) for five-minutes sixteen-seconds to the song of Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport.

According to Guinness, the previous world record for the World's Largest Musical Instrument Ensemble (for Unconventional Instruments) was held by 359 employees of AIRMILES of Bolton, Lancashire, United Kingdom, who successfully played their Wobble Boards for five minutes to the song of Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport, on July 12, 2007. Wobble Boards are made of 2-foot by 3-foot hardboards--such as Masonite boards--that are played by "propping them between the palms of the hands and bouncing them back and forth". The first Wobble Boards were created by Rolf Harris in 1957. In 1960, Harris included the wobble sound in his international hit song Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport.

Guinness World Records lists six rules that must be followed for producing the World's Largest Musical Instrument Ensemble (using Unconventional Instruments). They are: "1) All members of the ensemble should be directed by someone who signals the beginning and end of the attempt. 2) A formal registration process should take place. The number of musicians is confirmed by individuals signing their own names once only a form witnessed by two independent persons. 3) As full a recital as possible should be given to be directly comparable with the original record but, if this is not practicable, a recognized orchestral piece of music lasting at least five minutes should be performed, with all musicians playing at some stage during the recital. 4) If a non-classical piece is played, it should be re-scored for the performance. If a choir is used, the number of members should be given, but this will not count toward the record. 5) Improvisation is not permitted. 6) The name of the organization, company or person(s) organizing the attempt should be given along with the date and place."